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Harvesting - Turnip





Fast Facts




Planting to Harvest 40 - 75
Average Yield 40 to 50 turnips
Recommended planting for a family of five 25 feet of row
Recommended Uses

In this country the roots are usually eaten boiled, either fresh or from pit or cellar storage. In Europe kraut is commonly made from the sliced roots.

Boil, steam, stir-fry/saute, braise/stew, bake, deep fry, gill/broil, pressure cook, microwave, raw



Additional Information



Harvest Recommendations

Harvest turnip greens when they are young - about half the time needed for mature root crop.

Harvest turnips when they are 2 to 3" across or before the weather reaches 80 F.

Leaves can be harvested from plants grown for roots if the growing tip is not damaged.

A light frost will improve turnip flavor.

Turnips are cool weather plants and therefore are not good for summer-harvested crops - except in regions with cool-summer climates.

Storage and Preservation Methods

To store turnips in the ground until they are ready to be used, put a thick mulch of straw, leaves, etc., over them to keep them from freezing - heavy frost can kill the tops. Heavy duty garbage bags full of dry leaves laid on top of the row are easy to remove and replace for winter digging. For convenience, a board can be laid on the row and covered with mulch, (or bags of mulch) then lifted for winter digging.

Common storage is in a root cellar. Dig, cut off stem 2" to 3" above the roots and store covered with sawdust or other material in a cool (32 to 40 degrees) moist location. Turnips will keep in the refrigerator crisper drawer for several months.

Turnips are also suitable for freezing.

 





Turnip

Tips

Leaves can be harvested from plants grown for roots if the growing tip is not damaged.

 

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